International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology

Gain a true understanding of international crimes

Crimes against humanity, terrorism and organized crime

How can a child soldier become a torturer? Can the International Criminal Court prosecute terrorists? How does human trafficking in the Sinaï work? In this Master’s programme, you’ll uncover all aspects of crimes related to conflict, focusing on the role of individuals, groups, states and the international community. You’ll delve deep into the psychology of perpetrators, learn about criminological theories on organizational processes, and discuss justice responses at local, national and international level.

International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology

In an ever more complex and globalized world, war, terrorism and criminality are increasingly intertwined. Conflicts lead to looting, killing, recruitment of child soldiers, genocide - and even terrorism. They can also lead to cross-border crimes such as human trafficking, kidnappings and wildlife crimes. International organizations, non-governmental (interest) groups and governments are confronted with questions about how to prevent and respond to these criminal acts, and how to deal with their harmful consequences. But a lack of knowledge means that effective responses often never get off the ground.

This Master’s programme is unique in several ways: literally, in that it’s not offered by any other university in the world. But also in its scope, because you’ll learn to combine insights and methodologies from several different disciplines: criminology, law, psychology, sociology and political science. And finally, our university is close to The Hague – home to the UN’s International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court – the legal capital of the world. This programme will truly prepare you for an international career in the field.

Lisa-Claire Hutchinson

Student from Australia

Lisa-Claire_Hutchinson

“International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology combines two of my passions. Prior to taking this programme, I had studied the domestic application of Criminological theory, and my exposure to International Law was confined to its legal context. Exploring the two disciplines together now is such an eye-opener! Reconciling the social science and the legal perspectives challenges students’ assumptions regarding the adequacy of past international criminal outcomes and encourages us think critically and flexibly about how the commission of international crimes might be averted in the future.

International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology is a one-year, full-time programme taught entirely in English. You’ll learn to analyse why people commit crimes in times of conflict (etiology), how to measure and investigate these crimes (prevalence), and how to critique modes of transitional justice (reaction). But the course isn’t just theoretical: you’ll have active discussions about international criminal law, and you’ll get the chance to apply criminological, sociological and psychological theories and methods to real-world case studies.

The ultimate aim of the programme is to understand why and in what contexts criminal acts take place, and what the suitable responses should be. This isn’t just an academic programme – it’s training for your professional career. You’ll have the tools to look at the evidence objectively, get hands-on experience in the field, challenge criminology theories, draft up policies to fight crime, and develop strategies to prevent future crimes.

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Programme
The goals of this Master’s programme are to:

  • Measure and map conflict-related crimes;
  • Define and conceptualize conflict-related crimes;
  • Explore the consequences and measure the costs of conflict-related crimes;
  • Study the causes of conflict-related crimes;
  • Analyse ways to effectively prevent and react to this type of criminality.


The following real-life case studies are covered by the programme:

  • The genocide in Rwanda and the civil war in former Yugoslavia;
  • The history and political context of the ad-hoc tribunals and the International Criminal Court;
  • Case law: command responsibility, superior orders, joint criminal enterprise;
  • Transitional justice processes in Colombia, South Africa, Angola and Afghanistan;
  • The involvement of corporations in human rights violations in the oil and mining industries;
  • Social psychology: Stanford Prison experiment, Milgram;
  • Conflict and terrorism in Syria, Libya and Iraq;
  • Transnational crimes: human trafficking, weapons trade, wildlife crimes;
  • Internal displacement and forced migration.


Schedule and courses
The academic year in the Netherlands runs from September to June, and is divided into a semester system. July and August are holiday months.
The programme consists of three compulsory courses in the first semester, and a choice of several optional courses in the second semester. You’ll conclude the programme with an interdisciplinary Master’s thesis focused on conflict-related crimes.

Here are just three examples of courses offered in the programme:

  • Atrocity Actors: Perpetrators, Bystanders and Victims
    Who are the people involved in atrocities? Why do perpetrators commit crimes like rape, torture and genocide? Why do so few people actively intervene? What are the consequences for victims? The aim of this course is to truly understand the psychology of the actors involved in atrocities.
  • International Criminal Courts and Tribunals
    Learn more about the International Criminal Tribunals for former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. Of course, to understand the inner workings of the International Criminal Court, you’ll need to take field trips to The Hague – the legal capital of the world is just a 30-minute train ride from the VU. Guest lectures from criminology experts complete the package.
  • Corporations, Conflict and Crimes
    Understand why and to what extent businesses are involved in gross human rights violations and international crimes. Use insights, knowledge and theories from disciplines such as history, social psychology, organizational sciences, business ethics and political science to complement your criminological approach.


Every April, you have the opportunity to join the ‘Transitional justice in reality’ field trip to Bosnia. See our Facebook group for more details

Programme schedule 2018/2019
Additional course descriptions

All schedules are subject to change.

Title
A Master of Science (MSc) degree is awarded to all students who earn a minimum of 60 credits. Credits are listed according to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), which is based on your workload – including hours spent in class, studying, writing papers and completing assignments. A full academic year is equivalent to 60 EC, one semester to 30 EC.

After graduating, you could look forward to a career in:

  • International criminal courts and tribunals
  • National prosecutions services and police
  • Europol, Eurojust
  • Intergovernmental organisations such as the UN, IOM
  • Human rights organisations
  • Refugee organisations
  • Ministries and think tanks
  • Universities or other research institutes
  • Journalism

Interdisciplinary perspective
The programme uses many different disciplines to approach conflict-related crimes – including insights from criminology, sociology, psychology, international criminal law and political science.

Strong research links to practice and academic research
You’ll visit all the important legal institutions in The Hague, while international experts regularly teach guest lectures and provide research seminars. If your grades are particularly high, you might be invited to take part in the research projects run by researchers at the Faculty's Centre for International Criminal Justice and the selective International Law Clinic course.

International and diverse
We attract and bring together a select group of highly skilled and motivated students from various backgrounds and nationalities. They have one thing in common, though: a deep desire to analyse, understand and help combat international crimes and gross human rights violations. In recent years, lawyers, journalists, criminologists, psychologists, sociologists, historians and many others have taken this programme. We have alumni from across the globe, including Rwanda, Colombia, Afghanistan, Armenia, Sudan, the United States, Canada and the EU. This diversity makes the exchange of knowledge and experiences even more stimulating. VU Amsterdam is the only university in the Netherlands, and one of the few universities in the world, to offer this specialization – giving you truly unique skills and experience to kick off your international career.

Summer School on International Criminal Justice
Is a whole year too long? Many of the questions addressed in the Master’s programme are also covered in the two-week Summer School on International Criminal Justice in Amsterdam. Fields of interest comprise criminology, law, psychology, social sciences and conflict studies.

Overview International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology

LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION

English

DURATION

1 year (full-time)

TUITION FEE

APPLICATION DEADLINE

1 April for students from non-EU/EEA countries. 1 June for Dutch students and EU students.

START DATE

1 September

STUDY TYPE

Full-time

FIELD OF INTEREST

Economics, Business and Law
Behavioural and Social Sciences

Study programme details

We regularly recruit interns to help with our academic research in CICJ projects such as ‘When Justice is Done’, ‘Escaping Justice’, and ‘Criminal Careers of Dutch War Criminals’. Students assist in gathering research – for example, through file analysis, discourse analysis or interviews. They then analyse this information and may even have the opportunity to publish in academic journals. We have many professional contacts in the field, and regularly help students to get internships at relevant institutions in or near The Hague. Past students have interned at many institutions, including:

  • International Criminal Court
  • International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia
  • International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
  • United Nations
  • Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Human Rights Watch
  • Amnesty International
  • Team International Crimes, Netherlands Police
  • Royal Marechaussee
  • Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement
  • Netherlands Institute of International Relations, ‘Clingendael’

Teaching staff of the International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology Master's programme conduct research at the Center for International Criminal Justice (CICJ).

CICJ is a university-based organization dedicated to interdisciplinary study, debate and research relating to the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, the crime of aggression and other gross human rights violations. In the search for effective means to study, prevent and react to such violence, the CICJ conducts legal and empirical research projects within an interdisciplinary environment.

As a Master’s student, you will be the first to hear about the outcomes of the research carried out, since the results will be incorporated in your lectures. High performing students are given the opportunity to assist as interns in ongoing research projects.

All the professors and assistant professors who teach the International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology Master's programme are highly qualified and engaged in ongoing research on international crimes. All staff members regularly publish in well-known peer-reviewed academic journals. Workshops and occasional lectures are taught by assistant professors or PHD candidates.

Staff members include:


Each year, several guest lecturers are also invited to teach – either giving a single lecture or a series of lectures in the context of a research seminar or an expert course.

Throughout the year, you’ll have the opportunity to take part in interesting activities, such as guest lectures, excursions or other extracurricular activities like documentary nights and study trips. These activities are organized either by teaching staff or by students who participate in the social committee. For more information, and to get an impression of past activities, visit our Facebook page!

Student experiences

Mohammed_Khatir

“I am from Sudan and I worked for several years for the International Committee of the Red Cross. The programme in International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology gives me the unique opportunity to compare the practical side of the work that I have done for the Red Cross with its theoretical component. The subjects in the programme reflect reality and they give me a broad, interdisciplinary perspective on the field. It requires quite some effort, intellectually as well as emotionally, but it’s so valuable that I can recommend it to anyone."

Mohammed Khater (Sudan), International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology student

Federica D'Alessandra "Before enrolling in the ICCC Master's programme, I had been conducting research on genocide and mass atrocities for four years, including field research in Northern India, the DR Congo, Northern Uganda and Rwanda. The programme constitutes a great opportunity to penetrate the core of international crimes, whether from a victim, perpetrator or bystander’s prospective. Active participation is encouraged, so I organized a guest lecture about the International Community as a Bystander with colleague Dr. Knauss, associate to the Harvard Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. The Master's programme gave me the chance to conduct a research parallel to my own, including an independent field trip to Somalia, resulting in an interesting work on transitional justice. The programme also gave me the chance to expand my network and develop important intellectual connection, as well as to meet some of the dearest friends I have today in my life. It is an enriching and unique experience, and I recommend you to take up the challenge."

Federica D'Alessandra (Italy), International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology student

Jelmer Brouwer "What I liked most about the International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology Master’s programme is that the group of students is small but very diverse and that the classes are truly interactive. The study has been demanding but definitely worth the effort, as it provided me with great opportunities outside the classroom as well. I have conducted a six-month internship at the human rights division of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where I was able to see the daily realities and practical aspects of my study. Afterwards I spent several months in Burma and Thailand, where I did research for my Master's thesis on ethnic conflict in Southeast Burma. I interviewed numerous staff members of embassies, NGOs and international organizations and was even able to interview the leader of the ethnic rebel group that my thesis focuses on. Besides that, I visited Burmese refugee camps in Thailand where I spoke with some of the 150.000 people that live there. The internship and fieldwork were the perfect contemplation of the theoretical courses and made the whole experience into the most enriching and educational of my life."

Jelmer Brouwer (The Netherlands), International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology student

Isabella Regan MSc ICCC "During my exchange to Oslo I attended classes in both human rights and international humanitarian law my attention was drawn to International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology (ICCC). ICCC is unique in the Netherlands, not only because of its programme, but also because of the students participating. With different backgrounds like law, sociology, psychology or criminology and coming from different nationalities each student contributes a different vision or context on the subject. Therefore, you learn to not only observe international crimes, but include history and political events in your analysis as well. "

Isabella Regan, International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology student

Former and current students have created a Facebook group and a LinkedIn group for exchanging news, experiences and professional opportunities. Here you can see what students and alumni are up to.

Dutch students

The Master's programme International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology is open to both Dutch and international students. This Master's programme is selective, meaning that all applicants (including Bachelor students of VU Amsterdam) need to apply by uploading additional application documents (see below: applicable application procedure). The International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology Master's programme is open to a limited number of students only. The Admission Board of this Master's programme will make a merit based selection of students.

The admission requirements are as follows:

  • Applicants must have at least a Bachelor's degree in Criminology, Law, Social Sciences, Political Science or Psychology.
  • Applicants who do not meet the abovementioned requirement(s) are also encouraged to apply, provided that they have a sound academic background and a demonstrated interest in and knowledge of international crimes.
  • Language proficiency requirements: VU Amsterdam requires all applicants to take an English test and to submit their score as a part of the application. Exceptions are made for students who have completed their education in Canada, USA, UK, Ireland, New Zealand or Australia. For Dutch students or students already residing in the Netherlands it’s possible to take the institutional TOEFL test that the VU Amsterdam offers. Please read our FAQ for detailed information about possible waivers.

Your previous education is compared to and valued through the UK Naric comparison system and, if necessary, through the Nuffic comparison and validation programmes. Especially students from non-EU countries should factor in the possibility that a relevant Bachelor’s degree could not be sufficient to enter into this Master's programme and their application could result in a rejection. The Faculty of Law does not offer any pre-Master's programmes.

Focus of the programme
The Admission Board would like to stress that the Master's programme focuses specifically and explicitly on the international crimes genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. This means that topics like human trafficking, drug trafficking and gangs will not be dealt with. Please take this into consideration before you apply.

The Admission Board will need to receive your complete file at all times in order to maintain a good overview of all applicants and to be able to make a good comparison between applicants. In addition, when in doubt the Admission Board can factor the other documents in the application to make a final decision. Incomplete files and files handed in after the deadline cannot be taken into consideration.

Criteria for selection
The main focus of selection will be on GPA or an overall grade average. Students should at least have a B or 7.3 as an overall average or a GPA of at least 3.

Other factors which will be taken into account in addition to the GPA:

  • A student’s level of interdisciplinarity
  • Mark and content of the bachelor or master thesis
  • Relevant experience (internship and work)
  • General impression of the candidate such as shown interest in international crimes, letter of motivation, letter of recommendation, proof of academic writing
     

Application procedure and deadlines

For both Dutch and international students, it is possible to send in an application from as early as November in the academic year preceding the academic year you would like to start with the programme.
The deadlines for application are:

  • 1 April for students from outside the EU.
  • 1 June for all other students. Please note: if international students apply after 1 April, we cannot guarantee accommodation for you.

Please note that the deadline for applying for the VU Fellowship scholarship programme is usually set to 1 March. If you wish to apply for the scholarship, both the scholarship application and the application for the programme should be completed simultaneously.

If you have any questions regarding the application for this master's programme, please read our FAQ or find our contact information below.

If you have an international (non-Dutch) degree, please scroll down to 'international students' for information about the application procedure.
If you have a Dutch degree, the following application procedure applies to you:

The Admission Board starts reviewing applications and accepting students in January, and continues to do so until all available places are filled. Therefore, early application is strongly advised.

Step 1 - Register via Studielink
First of all students will need to register through Studielink. You can find more information on (re-)registration here and on the payment of tuition fees here. The deadline for registration through Studielink is set to 1 June. Please note that registration through Studielink on time is mandatory in order to be registered at VU Amsterdam. If you are not registered at the VU before the deadline of 1 June you cannot participate in the Master’s programme International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology.

Step 2 – Upload your application documents onto VUnet before 1 June
After having completed you registration for the programme on Studielink you will be directed to VU’s student portal VUnet via an email. On VUnet you can complete your application. As this concerns a selective Master's programme, you are asked to upload a number of documents that are required for us to make a decision on whether or not you can be admitted. We will need a complete application before we can start processing your application.

List of required documents:
1. a certified copy of the appropriate academic degree in English or Dutch or if not yet graduated: a declaration from your home university with an expected graduation date (if available);

2. a certified transcript in English; If you have not yet completed your educational programme, please send temporary transcripts showing the grades you have received to date. In that case, please also send us a list of courses that are not on the temporary transcripts but that you will have to take to complete your programme;

3. a curriculum vitae; a curriculum vitae that includes your personal details and lists your previous education and relevant work experience;

4. a one-page letter of motivation; a one-page letter stating your reasons for applying to the programme. Also, if applicable, please specify in this letter the name of the specialization you are applying for;

5. a proof of academic writing: a maximum of three pages of a final paper or thesis for the academic degree which has been obtained (or any other paper in English that has been written for studies); If your previous curriculum did not include the writing of a thesis, any other representable piece of academic writing will serve as an alternative.
If you have not written anything in English during your studies, you can write a 3-5 pages abstract of a piece of academic writing including bibliography, in English. Please note, we will always check application documents for plagiarism.

6. letters of recommendation from two academic referees. If possible including the ranking position of the student (i.e. whether students belong to the top 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50% of the entire class); digital copies, uploaded in VUnet are preferred. If referees prefer providing their references directly to the university, please let them e-mail to admission.law@vu.nl.

7. a proof of proficiency in English (TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge). An Institutional TOEFL test done via VU language centre is also accepted. Please check the admission requirements and our FAQ to see if any reasons for a possible waiver of this requirement may apply to you.

The minimum English language proficiency requirements for admission to a Master's programme at VU Amsterdam are:
•IELTS: 6.5 - please note that candidates must take the Academic test and not the General one!
•TOEFL paper-based test: 580
•TOEFL Internet-based test: 92
•Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE): A, B, C
•Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): A, B, C
•Vu-test English-language proficiency: TOEFL ITP
For TOEFL and IELTS, the test must have been completed no more than two years before 1 September of the year in which your course starts.
Be aware of the fact that it can take a long time before you get the results of the English tests, so plan your test in time! Please note that you have to hand in a test result that meets the minimum before September 1, but preferably sooner. There is no specific place to upload your English language test in VUnet, you can send a copy of the test score card per email to admission.law@vu.nl.

8. a copy of a passport

9. a copy of a residence permit (if applicable).

10. optional: a course descriptions (list of most relevant courses that your bachelor studies consisted of); please note that the admission board may ask for this document at a later stage if its members consider this necessary for reviewing your application.

11. optional: a literature list or bibliography (list of most relevant books and articles used during your bachelor studies); please note that the admission board may ask for this document at a later stage if its members consider this necessary for reviewing your application.

No decisions on admission can be made by the Admission Board, until VU Amsterdam has received all your supporting documents within the deadline of 1 June (with the exception of a certified copy academic degree and proof of proficiency in English).

Step 3: Await decision on admission

The ICC Admission Board will have their first admission meeting in December and will have monthly meetings after that continuing until the end of June.

The first meeting after your application has been completed you can expect 3 results:
1. Negative decision;
2. Positive decision;
3. In Consideration.

If your application ends up in the last category you will receive a final decision either before the end of April, if you’ve applied with a complete file before 1 April, or before the end of June, if you’ve applied with a compete file after the first of April.

These is this year’s admission schedule:
Admission meeting in week: 19-25 December 2016, Decision in week 9-15 January 2017
Admission meeting in week: 23-29 January 2017,  Decision in week 1-5 February 2017
Admission meeting in week: 20-26 February, Decision in week 27 Feb – 5 March 2017
Admission meeting in week: 27 March – 2 April, Decision in week 3-9 April 2017
Admission meeting in week: 24-30 April, Decision in week 1-7 May 2017
Admissions meeting in week: 22-28 May, Decision in week 29 May – 4 June 2017
Admissions meeting in week: 26-June to 2 July, Decision in week 3-9 July 2017

Questions on admission and application
If you are a student with a Dutch degree and you have any questions on admission or application, please contact admission.law@vu.nl.

If you have an international degree, please contact our Admission Officer, ms. Laura Smit: admissionsfl@vu.nl.

General questions
If you have any general questions after reading the website, please contact our Communications department: info.law@vu.nl.

International students

The Master's programme International Crimes, Conflict and Criminology is open to a limited number of student only, both Dutch and international. Therefore, admission is based on a strict merit based selection procedure.


Academic requirements

  • Applicants must have at least a Bachelor's degree in Criminology, Law, Social Sciences, Political Science or Psychology.

  • Applicants who do not meet the abovementioned requirement(s) are also encouraged to apply, provided that they have a sound academic background and a demonstrated interest in and knowledge of international crimes.


Language requirements

VU Amsterdam requires applicants to take an English test. You can already apply online without having the test results. If you gain admission we need to receive the test results before June 1 if you are a non-EU student and before 31 August if you are an EU student. In case you haven’t taken a test yet we advise you to plan a test date as soon as possible. Below you will find the minimum English test scores:

Name TestMinimum Score
IELTS (academic)Average score: 6.5
TOEFL paper based580
TOEFL internet based92
Cambridge English Proficiency ExamA, B, C
Cambridge English Advanced ExamA, B, C

Please refer to our general application and language requirement page for international students, if you wish to find out whether there is any possible reasons for us to waive this requirements for you.


Focus of the programme

The Admission Board would like to stress that the Master's programme focuses specifically and explicitly on the international crimes genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. This means that topics like human trafficking, drug trafficking and gangs will not be dealt with. Please take this into consideration before you apply.


Criteria for selection

  • A strong focus of selection will be on GPA or an overall grade average. Students should at least have a B or 7.3 as an overall average or a GPA of at least 3/4.
  • A student’s level of interdisciplinarity
  • Mark and content of the bachelor or master thesis
  • Relevant experience (internship and work)
  • General impression of the candidate such as shown interest in international crimes, letter of motivation, letter of recommendation, proof of academic writing

The master is committed to maintaining a diverse student population. Therefore, admissions decisions will also take into account the gender balance, geographic spread, and study background.

Your previous education is compared to and valued through the UK Naric comparison system and the Nuffic comparison and validation programmes. Especially students from non-EU countries should factor in the possibility that a relevant Bachelor’s degree may not be sufficient to enter into this Master's programme and their application could result in a rejection. The Faculty of Law does not offer any English taught pre-Master's programmes.

It is possible to send in an application from as early as October in the academic year preceding the academic year you would like to start with the programme. The ICC Admission Board will have their first admission meeting in December and will have monthly meetings after that continuing until the end of June. We aim to have small groups each year so we advise you to apply early while there is still enough spots available in the programme.

As this is an interdisciplinary Master with a limited number of students, the admission committee pays special attention to the heterogeneity of the cohort. An overall balance in terms of disciplinary and geographical origins is a specific consideration for selection. In order to achieve this balance, the Committee can decide to put their decision on a specific application on hold (e.g. if they have received too many applications from people with a particular background).

Online application

For the online application, international degree holders can follow the online application procedure for international students .


Documents

Please prepare the following documents. You can find an explanation of each document on the online application page for international students . All documents should be provided either in English or Dutch.
List of required documents:
1. a certified copy of the appropriate academic degree in English or Dutch or if not yet graduated: a declaration from your home university with an expected graduation date (if available);
2. a certified transcript in English of grades obtained;
3. a curriculum vitae;
4. a two or three pages letter of motivation, explaining your reasons for wanting to participate in this programme in relation to your academic background and your plans for the future;
5. a proof of academic writing: a maximum of three pages of a final paper or thesis for the academic degree which has been obtained (or any other paper in English that has been written for studies);
6. At least one letter of recommendation from an academic referee. If possible including the ranking position of the student (i.e. whether students belong to the top 1, 5, 10, 25 or 50% of the entire class);
7. a proof of proficiency in English as per listed above. An Institutional TOEFL test done via VU language centre is also accepted. Note, that this document can be supplied later. Deadlines were mentioned earlier.
8. a copy of your passport;
9. a copy of a residence permit (if available).


Deadlines

The Admission Board will need to receive your complete file at all times in order to maintain a good overview of all applicants and to be able to make a good comparison between applicants. In addition, when in doubt the Admission Board can factor the other documents in the application to make a final decision. Incomplete files and files handed in after the deadline cannot be taken into consideration.


Await decision

The ICC Admission Committee will have its first admission meeting in December and will have monthly meetings after that continuing until the end of June.

During the admission meetings the evaluations of the Admission Committee can result in 3 types of decisions:
1. Negative decision;
2. Positive decision;
3. In consideration.

If your application ends up in the last category, you will receive a final decision either before the end of April if you've completed your application before 1 April, or before the end of June, if you've applied with a complete file after the first of April.


This year’s meeting schedule

Admission meeting in week: 19-25 December 2016, Decision in week 9-15 January 2017
Admission meeting in week: 23-29 Januaryi 2017,  Decision in week 1-5 February 2017
Admission meeting in week: 20-26 February,  Decision in week 27 Feb-5 March 2017
Admission meeting in week: 27 March-2 April,  Decision in week 3-9 April 2017
Admission meeting in week: 24-30 April , Decision in week 1-7 May 2017
Admissions meeting in week: 22-28 May, Decision in week 29 May-4 June 2017
Admissions meeting in week: 26-June to 2 July, Decision in week 3-9 July 2017


Finalize registration

If you’ve been admitted you can follow the steps on the what to do after admission page on the admission and language requirement page.

In case you are unsure on what to do, always feel free to contact Ms. Laura Smit, your international student advisor: admissionsfl@vu.nl.

VU Amsterdam offers various scholarships to international Master's students.

Do keep in mind that if you want to apply for a scholarship, you need to do so before before 1 February.

Visa/Residence permit

Students from non-EU/EEA and Visa required countries who will stay for a period longer than 3 months, are required to obtain a permit for temporary stay (MVV- Machtiging tot Voorlopig Verblijf) in order to enter the Netherlands. The university applies for this visa by a so-called ‘accelerated visa procedure’. Students can not apply for a MVV themselves. 
More information on the application for your residence permit 

Insurance

Before you come to the Netherlands, you should inquire whether your current health insurance will suffice in the Netherlands or if you need a supplementary cover. If you are insured with your own company for your stay in the Netherlands, take a proof with you that you are. 
More information on insurances

Contact a student ambassador

Some international students are happy to tell you about their experiences with living and studying in Amsterdam. These Student Ambassadors come from all over the world and have attended various bachelor's and master's programmes.

Our student ambassadors are listed on the webpage below. Reach out to them and get their stories about being a student at VU Amsterdam!

Information for international students  > International degree holders > Contact our student ambassadors 

Questions on admission and application 
If you are a student with a Dutch degree and you have any questions on admission or application, please contact  toelatingscommissie.rechten@vu.nl .

If you have an international degree, please contact our Admission Officer, ms. Laura Smit: masters.law@vu.nl.

General questions 
If you have any general questions after reading the website, please contact our Communications department: info.law@vu.nl